Ph.Ds of FOOD

Singapore Food Blog

北京美食之旅 – 干锅居

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Another restaurant chain commonly visited by locals is 干锅居, which specializes in 贵州菜.

干锅居

干锅居

And their specialty:

苗家干锅鸡

苗家干锅鸡

The 苗家干锅鸡 (griddle cooked chicken with pepper, 59 RMB) was served in a wok, atop a lighted stove. The chicken has already been cooked, but it was the 腐竹 (dried tofu strips) and 酸笋 (bamboo shoots) which were still hard and crunchy. Hence, this dish was finished on the table, where the waitress would periodically walk over to stir fry and finish up this dish. The chicken chunks were very well-flavoured and tender. It wasn’t overly spicy, though it started to get a little oily towards the end.

茶树菇双腊

茶树菇双腊

The 茶树菇双腊 (sauteed preserved meat with agrocybe aegerila, 39 RMB) was a mediocre stir fry dish. The mushrooms were a tad under-flavoured and the preserved meat was so fatty that we totally avoided it. This dish could do with a little more spiciness.

蛋黄南瓜

蛋黄南瓜

The 蛋黄南瓜 (deep-fried pumpkin with yolk, 19 RMB) wasn’t too oily; the pumpkin slices were coated in a thin egg yolk batter and deep fried to create that crunchy outer crust while still retaining the soft pumpkin flesh. One downside was that we figured that the pumpkin was coated in an egg yolk batter which was added with salt, instead of using a salted egg yolk batter. This resulted in the pumpkin exuding a very monotonous, heavy, dense and one-dimensional saltiness. A salted egg yolk batter would have better elevated the saltiness and fragrance of this dish.

天麻煲排骨

天麻煲排骨

The 天麻煲排骨 (braised spare ribs with rhizoma gastrodiae in casserole, 39 RMB) was a very rich pork-ribs based soup. In fact, for those who are sensitive towards the taste of pork, this soup is a definite no-no. The richness, flavour and aroma of the pork came out very strongly in this soup. It was also rather salty, not the kind of light, refreshing soup to end a rich meal.

干锅居 – 五道口店
海淀区中关村东路1号
(清华东门外搜狐网络大厦二层)

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Written by foodphd

August 23, 2013 at 5:49 pm

Posted in Beijing, Chinese

Tagged with , , , , , ,

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