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Sakae Sushi

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Sakae Sushi

Sakae Sushi

Sakae Sushi has got to be one of Singapore’s longest standing Japanese sushi franchises. Our strongest memory of Sakae Sushi was its high tea sushi buffet where we devoured plates and plates (excluding the red ones) of sushi and other Japanese finger food from the conveyor belt. But the influx of other popular sushi chains like Itacho and Sushi Express has caused a reduction in market share for Sakae Sushi. Thus, explaining the need for a launch of the new menu!

And the biggest beneficiary for such healthy competition?

Us! The food lovers!

Ika Okura

Ika Okura

Asari Miso

Asari Miso

Honey Sakura Ebi

Honey Sakura Ebi

For those who love the characteristic stickiness and gooeyness of lady’s fingers, along with the slimy strands of sap, do give the Ika Okura a try. The Ika Okura was a rather unique and refreshing appetizer of sliced lady’s fingers with small chunks of squid. However, the presence of the squid seemed to be overshadowed by the sliminess of the lady’s fingers. Taste wise, it was very light and not too strongly flavoured. It was more of a healthy cold dish to cleanse your taste buds.

On the other hand, the other 2 appetizers were much stronger in flavour. The Asari Miso, or seasoned clams, reminded us of Chuka Hotate. The taste was largely similar to Chuka Hotate. Only that the scallop was replaced by clams. The Honey Sakura Ebi was also somewhat similar to the local favourite hae bee hiam, aka spicy dried shrimp sambal, just that the former was less spicy and slightly sweeter. Both appetizers were pretty addictive – small little packets of strong flavours.

Kohada

Kohada

Katsuo

Katsuo

Nama Kaki

Nama Kaki

The Kohada (Gizzard Shad) was something we had not tried before. We had initially though that the silver leather-lookalike skin would be tough and rubbery, but it turned out otherwise. The skin was indiscernible. There was slight similarity to the taste of the mackerel (saba), with a slightly outlandish fishy taste.

The Katsuo (Skipjack Tuna) was very different from the typical tuna sashimi. It had a strong smoky fragrance and taste, almost being able to pass off as some kind of smoked meat.

The Nama Kaki (Oyster) was very fresh – that’s the least one can ask for. The minced garlic atop, coupled with Tabasco sauce, added the extra kick to the already outlandish oyster sashimi.

Mentai Kamo Sushi

Mentai Kamo Sushi

Aburi Nama Hotate Sushi

Katsuo Aburi Sushi

Katsuo Aburi Sushi

Incorporating duck into sushi seems to be rather popular in many sushi outlets in the recent years – a sign of the growing influence of the French style into Japanese cuisine. And if done well, this would definitely be a hit amongst customers. Sakae Sushi’s Mentai Kamo Sushi was probably one of the more popular dishes of the meal. The smoked duck was tender, without being overly rubbery. The subtle smoky fragrance and taste lingered in the background, with the grilled creamy codfish roe exuding a strong savouriness. We particularly enjoyed the Mentai Kamo Sushi.

The Aburi Nama Hotate Sushi was also another winner! The scallops were fresh, large and juicy. The scallops were lightly seared, giving it a half-cooked, half-raw texture. The touch of the salmon roe gave that last sea saltiness kick.

The Katsuo Aburi Sushi was similar to the Katsuo sashimi – where we could also detect that subtle smokiness from the skipjack tuna. The tuna slices however, were thinner in the sushi version. Coupled with the presence of the vinaigrette rice, the fishy taste of the skipjack tuna was slightly toned down.

Ooba Tempura

Ooba Tempura

The presentation of the Ooba Tempura seemed a little too Chinese restaurant-like, didn’t quite look like a Japanese dish. The tempura consisted of a lightly battered white fish wrapped in ooba leaf. When we bit into it, we felt that the fish seemed to have been minced and then wrapped within the ooba leaf, in contrast to our initial expectations of a fish fillet. The batter was crispy, and not overly oily. On a whole, it was a decent tempura.

Seafood Kimchi Ramena

Seafood Kimchi Ramena

Chicken Kimchi Ramena

Chicken Kimchi Ramena

The Seafood Kimchi Ramen fell short of the strong spicy tanginess of Kimchi in the soup base. We could detect the subtle taste of kimchi, but we were looking for something with more punch and kick. The noodles were decently done. But the biggest shortcoming of the ramen was the eggs. We had expected a Ramen runny yolk egg, not an almost fully cooked egg.

Mango and Pear Pudding

Mango and Pear Pudding

A refreshing dessert to finish off the meal was the Mango and Pear Pudding. Both puddings were very strong in their respective flavors and would be suitable for those with really sweet tooth.

Note: This is an invited food review.

Sakae Sushi
#02-207, Marina Square
6 Raffles Boulevard

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Written by foodphd

June 18, 2013 at 10:52 am

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