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Peony Jade Restaurant

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Peony Jade Dim Sum

Peony Jade Dim Sum

Touted to offer one of the best custard buns in Singapore, how can we miss out on visiting Peony Jade as we continue our hunt for the best 奶皇流沙包!

Steamed Custard and Salted Yolk Bun

Steamed Custard and Salted Yolk Bun

Steamed Custard and Salted Yolk Bun

Steamed Custard and Salted Yolk Bun

Steamed Custard and Salted Yolk Bun 香软奶皇流沙包 ($4.20) – Unlike other custard buns, Peony Jade’s version makes use of a Pandan accentuated bun skin. The uniqueness of the faint Pandan taste and aroma was a plus point, but we were let down by the hard and tough bun skin texture. However, the best part remains to be the fillings and Peony Jade did indeed live up to its reputation. Breaking apart the bun and the fluid filling started to seep out. It wasn’t too oily and there was a good balance between the sweet custard and salty egg yolk, without tasting overly pungent. It was rich and flavourful and as you allowed the bun to cool, the fillings thickened into a viscous, molten-like texture, which was equally enjoyable.

Peony Jade Steamed Har Kau

Peony Jade Steamed Har Kau

Peony Jade Steamed Har Kau 水晶鲜虾铰 ($4.90) – The prawn dumplings exuded a distinct Cantonese dim sum taste and were packed with every goodness of the fresh crunchy prawns. The dumpling skin was thin and tightly encompassed the generous fillings of prawns. Within the fillings, there were also strips of bamboo shoots which added a tinge of sweetness and crunchiness to the dumplings.

Steamed Meat Dumplings with Fish Roe - Siew Mai

Steamed Meat Dumplings with Fish Roe - Siew Mai

Steamed Meat Dumplings with Fish Roe – Siew Mai  鱼子蒸烧卖 ($4.80) – The plating and presentation of dim sum do play an important role in a customer’s first impression. Looking at each individual siew mai – the fillings were packed fully and literally bursting out of the little pockets of skin, this was indeed a pretty sight. The fillings were predominantly meat, but the addition of prawns elevated the texture to be less one dimensional. Not overly pungent with pork taste, coupled with the sweetness of prawns, the siew mai was also a well-liked dish.

Steamed Three Treasures Chicken Roll

Steamed Three Treasures Chicken Roll

Steamed Three Treasures Chicken Roll  三宝鸡扎 ($5.20) – The most expensive dim sum item of our meal turned out to be the most disappointing. Perhaps we were expecting too much, but the chicken roll turned out to be something akin to 腐皮卷 beancurd roll. The three treasures were chicken, mushrooms and crabstick. It was particularly disappointing to find that crabstick was one of the the three treasures. Strictly speaking, it wasn’t an awful dish. But for that price, this dish definitely fell short of expectations.

Peony Jade Restaurant
M Level, Keppel Club
Bukit Chermin Road

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Written by foodphd

April 29, 2012 at 11:23 am

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