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Brasserie Gavroche

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Brasserie Gavroche

Brasserie Gavroche

Moving into the old premises of Table 66 at Tras Street is Brasserie Gavroche, headed by the former executive chef at the St. Regis Singapore. Brasserie Gavroche is a quaint, rustic old school French restaurant dishing up the usual French cuisine and some classic favourites from Chef Frédéric Colin’s family.

Baguette and Butter

Baguette and Butter

Cheese Bread

Cheese Bread

Besides the typical baguette and butter, Brasserie Gavroche serves cheese breads. These miniature breads came with a hard crispy crust and a savoury moist centre which tasted mildly of cheese. It was a unique pre-appetizer.

Escargots de Bourgogne au beurre d'ail

Escargots de Bourgogne au beurre d'ail

Escargots de Bourgogne au beurre d’ail ($19) – Burgundy snails baked in their shells with parsley and garlic butter. Nothing too fantastic with the escargots, but we did enjoy the strong herb taste.

Soupe a l'oignon, recette de grand pere Henri

Soupe a l'oignon, recette de grand pere Henri

Soupe a l’oignon, recette de grand pere Henri ($14) – Grandpa Henri’s traditional onion soup. The onion was rather thick and overwhelming with a significant amount of onions. It reminded us of those double boiled Chinese soups, and less of a French dish. The baguettes soaked inside the soup were decorated with a small amount of cheese. We were, however, craving for a larger proportion of cheese.

Quenelle de poisson sauce Nantua, recette de grand-pere Henri

Quenelle de poisson sauce Nantua, recette de grand-pere Henri

Quenelle de poisson sauce Nantua, recette de grand-pere Henri ($33)- Grandpa Henri’s fish quenelle with crayfish sauce. A quenelle is a mixture of creamed fish, chicken, or meat, sometimes combined with breadcrumbs, with a light egg binding. In Brasserie Gavroche’s version, fish was used in the quenelle, served with a crayfish butter cream sauce. The quenelle had a mousse like texture with a mild taste of fish. This was a rather unique dish as we haven’t seen much of it in other French restaurants. It went down easy on the palate and would be suitable for non-meat eating diners. The accompanying crayfish sauce was rather overwhelming, tasting strongly like lobster/crab bisque. The bits of crayfish in the sauce somewhat resembled crabstick rather than crayfish.

Mousse au Chocolat

Mousse au Chocolat

Mousse au Chocolat ($14) – This was a dessert highly recommended by the manager who claimed that a single diner would find it hard to finish the chocolate mousse. And boy was he right! This chocolate mousse may look simple and non-intimidating, but it was rich in chocolate. There was nothing decorative or fanciful about it. It was a simple, homogeneous chocolate mousse. But we thoroughly enjoyed the chilled, soft and soothing bitter-sweet chocolate mousse. In fact, it was something like ice cream! We did however feel that the chocolate mousse could do with a bit of alcohol, which would probably reduce the sweetness and elevate the taste of the chocolate.

Brasserie Gavroche
66 Tras Street

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Written by foodphd

January 7, 2012 at 6:17 pm

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