Ph.Ds of FOOD

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Antoinette

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We have always been fans of Canele‘s cakes and having learnt of Chef Pang’s (Canele’s ex executive pastry chef) departure from Canele and the setting up of his Sugar Daddy company, we were eager to try his latest creations at Antoinette. If you hadn’t known, Antoinette is actually a French name, meaning beyond praise or highly praise-worthy.

Antoinette

Antoinette

Antoinette

Antoinette

Upon entering Antoinette, the seemingly familar display of cakes and pastries reminded us of Canele at Robertson Quay. But as we proceeded through the entire meal, we realized there were still many differences between Antoinette and Canele, as Chef Pang attempts to shake off the Canele image.

The wide array of cakes meant that we took a pretty significant amount of time to make our choices. There were some pretty interesting cakes which revolved around the use of caramel. But finally, we settled for 2 chocolate desserts.

Chocolicieux

Chocolicieux

Chocolicieux

Chocolicieux

Chocolicieux – Dark chocolate cream 66%, hazelnut nougatine, dark chocolate biscuit, almond chocolate glaze. Chocolicieux sure has the looks of a Magnum ice cream. But it is definitely not ice cream, but made up of cream. The interior was filled with dark chocolate cream. Texture wise, it wasn’t too soft or creamy, but had a slightly harder and more chewy texture. There were bits of nuts inside, which added crunchiness to the cream. Though Chocolicieux consisted largely of dark chocolate, the sweetness contributed by the nougatine reduced the bitterness. Interestingly, Chocolicieux felt like a distant relative of Caraibe from Canele.

Le Royale

Le Royale

Le Royale – Dark chocolate mousse 64%, almond meringue, hazelnut almond feullitine, chocolate genoise, dark rum. Now, doesn’t the name “Le Royale” ring a bell? Definitely! Because Canele has a cake called Le Royale as well! Antoinette’s Le Royale essentially consists of 4 layers: a top thin layer of fudge-like chocolate, followed by a beige/light brown sponge-like layer, a layer of chocolate mousse filled with crunchy bits of feullitine and finally a chocolate sponge layer. Taste wise, this cake was actually towards the light side, it wasn’t very rich in chocolate. There wasn’t any taste of rum, and the crunchy feullitine was lacking in the nutty ferrero rocher taste and aroma. It wasn’t really all that satisfying for chocolate cake lovers.

Gnocchi Carbonara

Gnocchi Carbonara

Gnocchi Carbonara

Gnocchi Carbonara

Gnocchi Carbonara – Parisian Guocchi sauteed with caramelized bacon, white wine cream sauce, served with poached egg and aged parmesan cheese. Our only main course of the evening was the Gnocchi Carbonara. One thing we love about this dish was its richness in flavour. The potato gnocchi was slightly charred on one side, leading us to believe that the Gnocchi was pan fried prior to the addition of the carbonara sauce. The gnocchi was soft and mushy. On its own (without the sauce), it was salty and flavourful with the taste of bacon unlike the ones we had at Italiannies. Strangely, the bacon seemed not to be as salty, and neither did it taste caramelized. Perhaps the gnocchi had thoroughly absorbed the essence and saltiness of the bacon. Together with the parmesan cheese, the sauce was similarly rich and robust in flavours. But overall, we did feel that a single person would find it hard to finish this dish on his/her own as it would get pretty overwhelming after a while.

Though there were some similarities between Canele and Antoinette, we must admit that Antoinette does have an unique class of its own. For starters, the chairs, tables and cutlery seemsed to be on the high-end side. From the napkins, coffee cups to the serving dishes, every cutlery item was labelled with the Antoinette symbol – a classic gold letter “A”. The serving staff were well-dressed and very polite. Service was impeccable. When we requested for the bill, what came was a quaint silver metallic box. Opening it up revealed the bill for the meal. Every bit of Antoinette reminded us of a high-end French restaurant, with much friendlier prices ($40 for 2 cakes and 1 main course).

Antoinette
30 Penhas Road

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Written by foodphd

June 25, 2011 at 4:03 pm

One Response

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  1. […] the liquor. Overall the cake wasn’t that mind-blowing compared to the previous ones we had at Antoinette, and definitely not worth the […]


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