Ph.Ds of FOOD

Singapore Food Blog

Food Ph.D’s Scone Baking II

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Our 2nd attempt at baking scones saw us tweaking the recipes here and there, reading up a little more on scones and playing with the ingredients here and there.

before putting into the oven...

before putting into the oven...

baking in the oven...

baking in the oven...

freshly baked! 13 raisin scones

freshly baked! 13 raisin scones

This time round, we reduced the amount of butter while maintaining the same amount of flour. No baking powder and sugar were added. We also added water to create lighter scones. At the same time, we reduced the force and time spent kneading the dough. If you are too heavy-handed and knead the dough too much, the scones would turn out very tough. Less extra flour was also added during the kneading as too much would result in a tougher and drier mixture.

Alas, after all our considerations and tweaking of the recipe, the scones did not turn out as well as expected. Texture wise, they deviated even more from the authentic British scones. Taste wise, it was less buterry but did taste a bit over-baked. The scones were too starchy as well; it felt like we were having balls of starch. Disappointed we were, but we will still try again!

Food Ph.D’s Raisin Scones II:

Ingredients:
2 cups (250g) self-raising flour
30g butter
1/2 cup (125ml) milk
1/2 cup (125ml) water
50g raisins
pinch of salt

Preparation Method:
Preheat the oven to 220°C. Sift flour and salt together into a large bowl. Add butter and rub in lightly using fingertips. Combine milk and water. Make a well in the centre of the flour. Pour in liquid all at once, reserving about a teaspoon for glazing. Mix quickly to a soft dough. Turn onto a floured board. Knead lightly. Press or roll out to form a round about 2cm thick. Cut using a floured plain round cutter. Place on a greased oven tray and glaze with milk. Bake for about 10-12 minutes or until scones sound hollow when tapped. Cool on wire rack.

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Written by foodphd

May 17, 2011 at 10:47 am

Posted in High-tea, Scones

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